Biography

Henriette Strøm Kahr published latest article in Journal of minimally invasive gynecology entitled Venous Thromboembolic Complications to Hysterectomy for Benign Disease. a Nationwide Cohort Study. This article is available in PubMed with an unique identification number PMID: 29198736 and it is published in 2017. The coauthors of this article are Kahr HS, Thorlacius-Ussing O, Christiansen OB, Skals RK, Torp-Pedersen C, Knudsen A.


Research Interest

Cardiology, Cardiovascular Medicine.


Latest Publication Details

Article Title: Venous Thromboembolic Complications to Hysterectomy for Benign Disease. a Nationwide Cohort Study.

Co-Author(s): Kahr HS, Thorlacius-Ussing O, Christiansen OB, Skals RK, Torp-Pedersen C, Knudsen A

Affiliation(s): Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. Electronic address: henristrom@gmail.com.

PMID 29198736, Year 2017

Abstract: To estimate the risk of venous thromboembolic complications following abdominal, laparoscopic and vaginal hysterectomy when performed for benign disorders.Nationwide cohort study (Canadian Task Force Classification II-2).Data from Danish national registers on all women undergoing hysterectomy for benign conditions in the period 1996-2015.Women aged 18 and above who underwent hysterectomy for benign disease were stratified into 3 groups according to hysterectomy approach: abdominal, laparoscopic or vaginal.Hysterectomy.89,931 women met the inclusion criteria. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) as a diagnosis or cause of death was identified. Risk of postoperative VTE was examined with Cox proportional hazard models adjusting for age, surgical approach and relevant comorbidities. Mean age was 49.9, 47.9 and 54.3 years for women with abdominal, laparoscopic and vaginal hysterectomy, respectively. Crude incidences of VTE within 30 days after hysterectomy were 0.24% (n=142), 0.13% (n=12) and 0.10% (n=21). The most important predictors of VTE were approach to hysterectomy and a history of thromboembolic disease. In the multivariable analysis risk of VTE was significantly reduced with laparoscopic hysterectomy (HR 0.51; 95% CI 0.28-0.92, P=.03) and vaginal hysterectomy (HR 0.39; 95% CI 0.24-0.63, P<.001) when compared to the abdominal procedure. Data on postoperative heparin thromboprophylaxis were available in 53,566 patients and adjusted HR was 0.63 (95 % CI 0.42-0.96, P=.03) in patients receiving heparin thromboprophylaxis.The 30-day cumulative incidence of VTE after hysterectomy for benign conditions was low overall (0.19%). Laparoscopic and vaginal hysterectomy carry a lower risk than the abdominal procedure. Postoperative heparin thromboprophylaxis significantly reduces risk of VTE and should be considered especially if risk factors are present.

Journal: Journal of minimally invasive gynecology